How Can Women Flourish at Home and at Work?

In this episode, Kymberli Cook invites Joy Dahl and Brandy Baxter to talk about how women can flourish at home and at work with a focus on putting God first. 

About The Table Podcast

The Table is a weekly podcast on topics related to God, Christianity, and cultural engagement brought to you by the Hendricks Center at Dallas Theological Seminary. The show features interviews with guests who are experts on the chosen topic, and each episode is hosted by a member of The Hendricks Center’s team.

Timecodes
01:51
Guests and host introductions and the many roles they play at home and work.
09:42
How important are the roles women play as caretakers and as sisters in Christ?
13:13
Which roles are valued and devalued in our culture?
23:41
What is the key role of a Christian woman?
44:04
How can you flourish at home and work as a disciple of Christ?
Transcript

Speaker 1: 

Welcome to The Table Podcast where we discuss issues of God and culture, brought to you by Dallas Theological Seminary. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Welcome to The Table Podcast where we discuss issues of God and culture. My name is Kymberli Cook, and I'm the Assistant Director here at the Hendricks Center. And today we're going to be talking about how women can flourish in all the roles that they play in society. So that's a mouthful, and we'll unpack that as we go through. Today to get you oriented to who all is going to be having that conversation. Today, we're joined by Joy Dahl, who is the executive director of the Polish Network. And we're also joined by Brandy Baxter, who is the strategic partnerships director of the Polish Network. So we have the Polish Network representing today. We're so happy and thankful to have you guys here. 

Brandy Baxter: 

Thanks for having us here Kymberli. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Absolutely, our center has a little bit of a growing partnership with the Polish Network. And so you'll probably be seeing these faces and other faces with their organization often. So here we go. First off, I think it would be good for each of us to share a little bit about the roles that we have in our life, just so that those of you who are listening can be aware of what we have and have not done and that kind of thing in our lives as we kind of talk about what it means to really flourish in the midst of all of the different things that women tend to end up juggling. So first off, let's start with you, Brandy. Can you just tell us a little bit about yourself and your journey, and again, what roles you've had in your life? 

Brandy Baxter: 

Wow. So as you were asking that question, Kymberli, the first thing that went through my mind was like all the roles, I feel like a complicated stage production. So I have fulfilled so many different roles from daughter to sister, and now I'm mom and wife. And it's been an interesting journey just moving professionally from employee to small business owner. I served in the military for a short while. My husband is in full time ministry and he's also a dean of students. And so that brings its own set of challenges. And I just feel that every single day, the role that I'm playing in my life is its ever changing. And yet, I feel that the Lord has consistently brought me to one role, which is servant. And so, I'd love to talk about that today as the underlying root of all the different roles that I play. 

Brandy Baxter: 

A little bit more about me, I am, oh, gosh, let me think where to start. I'm currently pursuing my education with Regent University. I am, gosh, wife to an amazing husband and mom to two darling daughters. And my role at Polish as strategic partnerships director is super exciting, because it allows me to go out in the community, talk to others about the work that we're doing for working women of faith and invite them to join us in that mission of equipping, empowering and motivating. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Awesome. Thank you so much for sharing that. I had no idea that you were in the military. Your husband was in the military, too, right? 

Brandy Baxter: 

I was a bit of a cliché, but that's actually where we met. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Yeah. That's what I was wondering, oh, cool. That's very cool. My husband is in the military too, but I definitely was not. I have authority issues, I would not be a good situation. Joy, why don't you share a little bit about your life and the roles you've played and currently play and especially about also how you became passionate about faith and calling. 

Joy Dahl: 

Yeah, absolutely. So I grew up in the Washington, DC area, and my journey really started when I was young. My father passed away, my final promise to him was that one day I'm going to make you proud, and to me at age 13, that meant becoming a success. So for the next 20 years, I pursued all I could in becoming successful in the world, by age 33 became CFO of a regional Broadcasting Company in New York. And by the world standards, I had it all, I had the American dream but inside I was broken. I prayed to God, I believed I was Christian, but I didn't have a relationship with Christ. I didn't understand what that meant. Then at age 35, I met Jesus. A co-worker actually gave me the book Purpose Driven Life and prompted me to go to church and I met the Lord and my trajectory changed at that point. I went from being a CFO to starting my own CFO consulting practice, I had that for over 10 years, ultimately came to Dallas. 

Joy Dahl: 

My forte was providing CFO services to startup and high growth companies. And then I felt the Lord call me to come to seminary, so I transitioned out of my CFO practice, became the role of seminary and trying to dig deep into God's word without really knowing what was on the other side, it really was a time being a faith walk of trusting him. And it was about halfway through my master's program, that I first learned a theology of work what it means to be an ambassador of Christ, what it means to be made in the image of God who works and who ordains work, prepares work for us to enter into. So that prompted me to go on to my doctoral studies, which focused on integration of faith and work and theology of work. And that led to my current position now as executive director of Polish where we gather women to navigate the workplace and explore faith together in authentic community. 

Joy Dahl: 

And a big part of, I feel like my primary role in this time is sharing the truth about who we are as ambassadors of Christ, made in the image of God commissioned by Jesus. And as women, many of us have never heard this message, many of us struggle to know what is the purpose that God has for me, what impact can I truly have in life? And is work a part of it or am I supposed to just be serving in a church? Am I supposed to just be focusing on my family? How do all of these different hats that we wear, how do those come together in God's plan? So that's a part of what we'll be talking about today, which is why I'm so excited. I am married to my amazing husband, Gordon, who is also a previous military. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Is he? All right. 

Joy Dahl: 

I know, we all have that connection. 

Kymberli Cook: 

That's awesome. 

Joy Dahl: 

So it's just an honor to be here today. And I love talking about just helping women to, as Brandy said, to get equipped, to be empowered, to be encouraged, and to walk in the calling that Jesus has for each and every one of us. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Fantastic. Okay, so a little bit about me, for those of you who are listening. I'm originally from Kansas, and daughter, sister, all of those kinds of roles. And I came down here to Dallas to work on my THM. And I met my husband while I was here and then I ended up working here at DTS, and for the Hendricks Center. And my roles here have kind of bloomed and flourished. So then I got bored, which is not good. And so I decided to do a PhD, which is not the way to cure boredom by the way. No, all joking aside, I really felt the Lord calling me to pursue that for a variety of reasons. And so I'm currently and then in the midst of that I had two little ones. So I've got two daughters as well. So I'm also a mother, which still sounds weird when I say. 

Kymberli Cook: 

So yeah, that's me, and where I'm from a little bit more, and I'm excited to talk about this, because we actually the three of us we are on a different call. And we all started talking about some of these issues and we all said we just need to do a podcast and record this conversation. So hopefully it will be interesting to you because it was interesting to us. So to get started kind of into the meat of what we're talking about, first I want us to explore a little bit about what roles women play in our society. So we've already hit on a few, mothers, wives. Let's see, workers and we can kind of explore that a little bit. And I guess church members, what other roles would you all throw in the ring as far as you know awareness of what, especially women right now play in our society? Brandy, let's start with you. 

Brandy Baxter: 

I'm thinking about where we are right now, and I feel that women have stepped back into the role of primary caretaker. I think generation there was a season where it was automatically expected for the woman to be the caretaker and then through the changes in our culture, more women entered the workplace, and that became socially acceptable. However, in the midst of a global pandemic, we see that as the tension between work and home really began rising to the surface, more women than men re-entered into that role of caretaker, for both young children and aging children. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Caretaker is a great one, and I hadn't really thought of but you're right. And it's not just children, it's like it, I don't know about any kind of nature nurture thing, but yeah, it just seems like at least society expects women to be the ones when the cards are down to be the ones to take care of the least of these, I guess. Joy, what else would you add? 

Joy Dahl: 

I think what comes to mind for me is really being a part of sisterhood, the sisterhood and community, sisters in Christ, sisters linking arms together, whether it's in the workplace, whether it's in our circles. Again, kind of coming from our conversations, we have amazing women part of our Polish Network but they're single, they're not married, they don't have kids. And they've had different struggles of isolation and connection and all of us struggling with, even for those of us who are part of a church community, what does that look like when you're not meeting in person? And how do you really foster community? What does it look like even for those of us who do work when you're not interacting face to face, but it's just for a screen, and you definitely feel that Zoom fatigue? 

Joy Dahl: 

So how do we come alongside each other? How do we build each other up? How do we share and care, show compassion, walk the journey together if we can't physically be side by side? I think that that's a real challenge, but a real need right now in that role, that I believe we're called to, and that I know that I need from my sisters as well. 

Kymberli Cook: 

As you're talking, I also think about it because I think that this, like this sisterhood would also be a part of this. I also think of the role of activist because I feel like in our current climate, and a lot of ways it's needed. But also it's expected that you have opinions and actions toward issues of social justice or environmental care, or that you kind of are expected to care about at least something but probably everything. But I also think of that. So let's explore these roles a little bit now that we've named some of them. Yeah. Which ones would you all say are valued and which ones seem to be devalued? Let's explore that for a little bit. Joy, do you want to take a first shot at that? 

Joy Dahl: 

I think it depends on what context you're talking about. I think, again, one of the primary ones, just because it's been a big part of my story, in work in career and the roles that I feel in trying to provide for myself, for my family, for those around me. How is work valued? Well, it depends who you ask. There are some people who have been very supportive of me, of my career, of what I have been able to create in terms of my own consulting practice. And then there was a lot of shock of me giving that up to go a different direction without knowing what that new path would hold. But really feeling like that was a calling for me. I think that there are women, especially right now who are really examining, where have they been so far in their work or their career, and what might be a next step? Is this the right time to go in different direction? 

Joy Dahl: 

So I think a lot of women are wrestling with those thoughts, those ideas right now. So, I think that there's also then if you're looking within a church community, women don't necessarily feel that their work outside the home is valued or is encouraged even. And that then leads to questions of well, how can I then serve in my church community with the gifts that I have and the skills and the experiences that I have. So value is a tough question. It depends who you're talking to, but that's what comes to mind first for me. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Well, and even as you were talking, I thought about another role that I'm a bit chagrined, but we didn't say. I feel like it was just assumed. But it's that of being a follower of Christ, and I thought of it in the context of what you were talking about, with like you stepped away from your job and all of that. I think making those decisions in the pandemic, and all of that, it's widely spread, this is your chance to reset all of that. So I think some people, turning to the Lord, maybe turning to ministry, like vocational ministry, or turning to just something as it relates to their faith that can be valued, and then it can also be incredibly devalued by our society, especially depending on how you do it and what you're doing. 

Joy Dahl: 

Yeah, I agree. 

Kymberli Cook: 

That was just one thing that came. 

Joy Dahl: 

Yeah, when I talk about workplace, for me it's in the context of all of us are as followers of Christ, called to be ambassadors. And that's going to look different for each of us, but there is absolute value in that role that we are called to, where Christ has equipped us, he's strategically placed us in whatever context we may be. In our context right now, we may be there for five months or five years, we don't know. But he has placed us to live and work and interact in our circles as his ambassador, working with excellence, creating genuine relationships, being his hands and feet. So I do think that that is a really important role that we don't necessarily see ourselves as filling if we have never heard that we as women, that we are created and commissioned and sent as Christ ambassadors to join the work he's already doing in our workplaces. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Yeah, I think maybe something helpful. And this is actually one of my favorite things to do probably, because I'm a little bit of a theology nerd, a lot of one. It's one of my favorite things to do when discussing the faith and work space is to really explore what it is that each role is contributing. Because I think sometimes we name these things, and sometimes it's a badge of pride, sometimes it's a badge of shame, again, depending on the context, and what's valued where. But I think for believers, and especially for sisters who sometimes haven't reflected on it, I think, really letting what you're doing and what you're contributing kind of settle into your soul can really help encourage you and propel you as you're being that ambassador. And then I'll let you all weigh in, on other roles that we've talked about. 

Kymberli Cook: 

So for instance, the role of a wife. As I fulfill the role of a wife, if I'm doing it in a Christ honoring, God honoring way, I am demonstrating love, I'm demonstrating faithfulness, and while it's only one person who is receiving it, that person is receiving a faithful, committed love that represents and demonstrates the faithful commitment of the Lord in a way that you really probably aren't going to see in many other contexts. So like that's one thing and in doing that, I'm creating a family unit that has economic impacts on our society, and all of that. But theologically, I'm sure, I mean, it's a sanctifying experience, you can go on to other things too. 

Kymberli Cook: 

But as far as what you're contributing, even just to that person, there is theological significance, there is not just theological, there's tangible, real things that you are contributing. So let's talk through a couple of the other roles. What do you see as the specifics of what people are contributing either to the kingdom or to society as a whole? Brandy, we'll start with you. 

Brandy Baxter: 

Yeah, really quickly, I want to kind of touch back on what Joy was saying about value, and who you're listening to, or who were asking the question. And what came to mind was, what echo chamber are you in? So if you're in an echo chamber of category A, then if your lifestyle and the role that you're currently fulfilling doesn't match up to that, you're going to feel devalued. And in my own personal experience, I've been the stay at home mom, I've been the working mom. And each season brought its own set of challenges, and yet its own set of rewards. But I really had to be intentional with who was I listening to, during that season? Did I hear affirming words or did I hear condemning words? And I feel like it's our responsibility as women of Christ to remember what he says about us above all else. 

Brandy Baxter: 

And I don't think in the Scriptures that there is a hierarchy or a value system placed upon roles and women. I think Scripture shows us that we have all been equipped with gifts that will edify the body. And to your point, Kymberli, it's for us to settle in to that, like Paul says, to be content, whether we are abase or whether we are abound, our society is forcing us into this, either or, and we have to say, "What does scripture say about me and the role that I'm playing in this season?" And ask the Lord... So to your second question about- 

Kymberli Cook: 

You're fine. Yeah. 

Brandy Baxter: 

But about the different roles. My belief as well, similar to Joy's is when we understand Scripture for ourselves, when we know what the word says, we are empowered to not allow others to devalue the work that we are doing. I struggled being an educated woman, and not working, but my children were so young, and I really felt a strong call to be present for them during that season of life. 

Brandy Baxter: 

And then I went to work and it was so crazy how I missed being at home with my kids. And yet, I mean, when I was at home with them, I missed being at work. I had to realize Brandy pray for contentment and peace, because God knows all things, he is the omniscient one and we have to trust that he has ordered our steps and silenced the echo chambers of society that are causing us to feel less than in one area or devalued in another. 

Kymberli Cook: 

And like what you're saying about, in that instance, choosing and recognizing a need to put more time and effort into the role of being a stay at home mom. And doing that. And I think sometimes, especially again, I like what you said about echo chambers, I really like that. In the echo chambers of the world, and especially the working world, that's like, "Oh, you had to step out, huh?" And really, if you think about it, that real one that's just incredibly devalues the role of mothers, because you're raising the next generation of this society, and I mean hopefully of the kingdom and the church, but you're even contributing to society in that way. And I think society doesn't really recognize that or has a hard time recognizing that at some point. 

Kymberli Cook: 

So Joy, can you think or take a couple other of the roles that we've talked about and kind of explore what it is they are contributing to society and why it is that they matter, why it's important that people are in these roles. And just so that people can, again, rest in the roles that they have and realize that there is valuable work being done. 

Joy Dahl: 

What comes to mind, and I want to be careful in saying this, but I almost hesitate to name specific roles, because one, I think, then we can segment ourselves that well, I'm this way in this role, and I'm this way in this role, and I'm this way. Instead of being a whole life, disciple of Christ with one sacred space, we now have different spaces. I think when we start naming roles, if someone doesn't fit into that role, then they can feel less than. So for example, I don't have children. So when we talk about moms and kids, and the wonderful journey of the different phases of childhood and motherhood and the challenges, I don't fit into that. So then I think this conversation may not be for me. If I am not actively working right now maybe I'm seeking work or what if I'm not married, maybe I'm a single or I'm divorced, I am divorced. 

Joy Dahl: 

And so there are conversations when I was not married, after I had been married that would make me feel less than because of the questions people would ask me and oh, I don't fit into that role anymore. So I do want to be careful about identifying specific roles because we all have roles that we fill those roles may change over time. The importance I believe, is really who we are and who we're walking with, because there is value in everything that we do. Again, we are strategically placed in every season of our life, to have impact to live with purpose and to walk the journey of life together as sisters. 

Joy Dahl: 

I almost hesitate going into specific roles because I don't want women to feel well there's higher value in this role, and I'm not a part of that, or they've talked about five roles and none of those apply to me so this conversation isn't for me. I think it's important for us to know that it's different for each of us and the role isn't as important as how we bring our whole self, faith skill, passion into whatever role we are called to or roles we're called to for a particular season. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Yeah, and I can see that and that's a good word. I think actually in support of what you're saying, I think it's also for people who might feel less than in whatever roles they have in life at any given time. I think it is helpful like for people to reflect on where they are at and what it is that they're really bringing, because I guess the encouragement and I think where the question was originally coming from is that the encouragement is that every single one of those roles is bringing something and you don't have to look around and say, "Well, I'm not a mom or I'm not a wife or I'm not in the office or I'm not..." That you don't have to look around and say, "Well, then I'm nothing, I'm not bringing anything." It's actually the reverse, it's saying no, every single one of them has something that you are contributing both to society as a whole and to the kingdom and so you need to just resting in that and delight in the path that the Lord has for you at this specific time. 

Kymberli Cook: 

And even if there's a variety of roles, even within your life, but those are things that you're doing. So I would just encourage you if you're listening to this, and you just think through what roles do I play and really consider how you are building into especially the kingdom because you'll find your heart very encouraged as you kind of do that exercise reflect on that. So we've talked a lot about roles but the other part of our... Brandy, you like you want to say something. 

Brandy Baxter: 

Yeah, I was going to say what I like about Joy's comment and then your follow up comment is what came to mind for me was disciple. And I think in my intro I mentioned that the heart of each of the roles that we play is a servant we are serving as unto the Lord. 

Kymberli Cook: 

I love that. 

Brandy Baxter: 

No matter what the title is, everything starts with how am I serving as unto the Lord? So whether I'm in the home, out of the home, whether I'm in the country or in the city, no matter where I am, how am I serving? But what also came to mind was discipleship in that how am I becoming disciplined in the role that I'm serving in? And I know as I shared a moment ago, my journey that's what the lesson that I believe God was teaching me. In addition to my prayer for contentment, I had to say, "Lord, what are you teaching me in these various roles of my life?" And he was teaching me discipline. Can you do this thing that I have called you to, without looking to the left or to the right? And a lot of times I feel that this culture of comparison is what steals our joy in whatever role we are in. And when we recognize that I think we are then better prepared to tackle it, and we can find the value in every role that we are in because we are learning to not only lean on the Lord but learning from him, what does he want us to know in this season in this role that we are currently in rather than looking at everyone else and the roles that they are in. 

Kymberli Cook: 

I agree with you and I think you're... It's actually a nice segue into where I was about to change the subject to anyway, which is great thanks for like it's that was the the logical tie to what it actually means to be flourishing. I think what we're talking about here is an encouragement, biblical and theological encouragement of what it really means for a woman to be flourishing in the variety of roles or in the single role that she plays in her life. And before we turn a little bit more to that, and really digging into perhaps what Scripture has to say, and some things that we can think about, I do want to explore a little bit. What do you all think society, the wider society would say, a flourishing woman looks like? Joy, you want to start? 

Joy Dahl: 

Sure, having spent much of my early career pursuing success in the world, and knowing where we are right now with social media, and kind of as Brandy was saying, we're in a society of comparison, of grantor and excess. And what can we have because there's status in that? How can we look because there's status in that? How many followers? So I think the greater society really focusing primarily on American culture, it really is about success, and who we portray ourselves to be. I think that creates a mask, that that's not who we really are. Many of us will wear a mask in whatever role we play. But then at some point, we take that mask off and maybe it's from shame of the past, maybe it's from just feeling that we have to compete or compare or be as good as or whatever it might be that I think it creates life behind the mask. 

Joy Dahl: 

So that's where I think that's the challenges of being in our society, that many of us, especially as women, I don't know that we feel comfortable showing the real us to the whole world. We may have a small group of people, Lord willing, we have at least a small group of people where we can be authentically who we are when that mask comes off. But I think it can be in family, it can be at work, it can be in church, it can be going out to dinner, or whatever it is we do. I think we often live behind a mask. And I do think that is part of our society, which makes it difficult to really have the freedom and the flourishing of who we are and the beauty of who we are and our likes and our dislikes, our passions, our gifts, our desires, being able to live authentically in relationship with others. I think it's a real challenge. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Brandy, [crosstalk 00:32:49] there's a lot that I want to dig into there. But Brandy, what I want you to add in what do you see as society's presentation of what it means to be a flourishing woman? 

Brandy Baxter: 

I totally share Joy's sentiments, and the word that came to mind was celebrity culture. So much of when we think of flourishing, and when we think of success, we equate that with celebrity status. And it's really disheartening that women who are followers of Christ have been lulled into the same belief. We follow celebrity preachers, we follow celebrity authors, we follow this, we follow that. And yet Jesus Christ himself was not a celebrity. And I think it's humbling when we find ourselves caught in this comparison culture and in this celebrity culture, I think it's very humbling for those of us as Jesus followers to say celebrity status does not equal success. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Yeah, and well and it's especially difficult, I have to be careful not to get on the hobbyhorse of mine here. But it's especially difficult in a democratic society because we have ingrained in us that there's something to the voice of the majority that is indicative of truth is indicative of the best of the way that things should be of the right. I just saw an advertisement the other day for I don't know some kind of app or something that was like 6 million people can't be wrong, and that's like the reverse of what it seems the kingdom that Jesus seems to be presenting in the Gospel. The narrow way, there was nothing about, this isn't in the gospels, but there was nothing about Jesus that was really attractive or beautiful that would draw you unnecessarily to, is like as far as the outward visage. And I think, yeah, I love that you brought up celebrity, and Joy, I think you're right with the mask. 

Kymberli Cook: 

I think that there is what I especially see, particularly in the influencer culture is those who become celebrities are the one to who do everything perfectly. And not like the '50s housewife, perfect, where like literally everything is in line. But you say the polite kind thing or you are authentic about your life in a certain way without oversharing, but it doesn't seem like you're hiding, and like that there's a mask. Like, "Oh, my child put paint over the walls, oh, no." That kind of thing. But not like, here's my junk, like here is the really bad stuff about me. But I think those are the people, the people who look really perfect, and seem to be navigating the waters of the difficult society in which we live and saying the right things at the right time, and holding off at other times and being authentic at certain times. And I think that that for women, and for everybody, quite frankly, I think that that is so exhausting for us to try to navigate and to do. 

Kymberli Cook: 

And I just I think for Christian women, we can just look at that and say like, you don't have to do that, you don't have to. And quite frankly and like to your point, Joy, those who are doing that, it's probably a mask, and they're probably someone that you want to think through how they influenced your life. So those are just some thoughts. So I want to keep going because we're going to start running short on time. We've talked a little bit about what it means biblically and theologically to be flourishing. We've talked about the concept of being an ambassador, which definitely comes straight out of Scripture, an ambassador for the kingdom. What are some other either metaphors or dimensions of flourishing, that we see in Scripture? And this isn't necessarily just women. And I laughed when I wrote this question, because what does it mean to flourish? Is like one of the big philosophical questions, it's huge and people have been thinking about it for thousands of years. So we're probably not going to solve it here but we can describe some things. 

Kymberli Cook: 

So one of the things that came to mind for me was the concept of abiding in Christ, and that he is the vine and we're the branches and the kind of that organic idea of he prune some things away. So we're willing to have some things of us cut off that aren't producing fruit, and just being woven into the Lord and abiding with him. Joy, what else? I'm sure you have many thoughts on this. 

Joy Dahl: 

I do. I've tried to go through my mind of what comes to the forefront. And this is something that I've really been praying through the last couple of months from Matthew 14, and just for anyone who's looking for where's the scriptural reference of ambassador to go back to that 2nd Corinthians 5, start at verse 17. But what comes to mind for this question is from Matthew 14, which is the story of Jesus feeding the 5000. But it starts with two fish and five loaves, that it's meager. It is a meager offering that the disciples bring and then Jesus does a miracle. And I really feel like in this season, where many of us are wrestling and think life has gotten hard, work has gotten hard, the roles that we play all get hard. I believe that is an act of trust and worship of we bring the little that we have in the morning, the two fish, the five loaves, we offer to Jesus. 

Joy Dahl: 

We allow him to take it and to work however he wants to use it for the glory, for the miracle that will unfold, whether we fully understand that or not what it is that he's going to do with what we offer. But that it's just kind of going back to the aspect Brandy said of discipline of each day we lay before him. This is what I have to offer. And at the end of the day, we know that we offered what we had. And that we can be confident that that is enough, that we don't have to be more, do more, that we offer the fish and the loaves, and he will take it and work with it. Our job is to come to him, to make the offer, to trust, to be faithful in that and then really rest that the results are in his hands. And we can have full faith that he will take our meager fish and loaves and use them for his kingdom economy. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Yeah, I love that. So the picture of a flourishing woman that we're getting is one who is winsomely representing the kingdom as an ambassador, and kingdom values, but one that is willing for some pain or some discipline to help prune their branches and bring forth fruit and who can just rest in the offering of what they have and not feeling like they have to bring more than what normal people really do. Brandy, what else would you contribute to this picture? 

Brandy Baxter: 

Yeah, so what came to mind for me is Psalms 37, where Scripture tells us to delight in the Lord, and he will give you the desire your heart. So often we are looking at what everyone else has and is doing and et cetera, et cetera. But if we especially as women who are followers of Christ, if we made our focus and our intention to delight in him and him alone, that becomes the sea of flourishing. And then when we feel these strong desires in our heart like I shared, the desire to be home with my kiddos or the desire to go back to work. I'm doing those things, knowing that I have spent time delighting in the Lord and he has placed that desire, therefore he will bless it, he will give me peace, he will give me contentment, he will give me joy, he will give me all the aspects of the fruit of the spirit because I first have committed to him, and I spend time delighting in him. 

Brandy Baxter: 

So often we find ourselves discouraged because we are finding and seeking delight in the things of the world. We are seeking delight in success. We are seeking delight in status. We are seeking delight in all of the trappings of the world, and they ultimately will bring about disappointment. So I envisioned the flourishing Christian woman as the one who says, "I'm going to be counterculture." I remember when that word was so prevalent in the church space, and (Kymberli chuckles) step back from it, but I really feel a call to re-engage in with the word counterculture. And so when I'm counterculture, I'm delighting in the Lord, then I am able to flourish. 

Kymberli Cook: 

I love that. And I've been in John Wesley's sermons a lot recently. And over and over, he hammers away at the idea of a true believer is one who loves God and who loves others. I mean, that kind of straight from the Gospels, and he just exhorts people over and over. He says, "Do you truly love the Lord? Do you truly love him?" And I thought of that when you're saying delight. Are you really the lighting in him? And then in that, as we've been talking about what our roles contribute to the kingdom and to society. Do you really love others? Do you see yourself as a servant to your point, Brandy? And that is what it means to be flourishing as a disciple. Again, this isn't even necessarily women, this is just as a disciple of Christ, loving God and loving others. But I think you're right. I'm so glad that you brought that point in. 

Kymberli Cook: 

So we have time for brief answers to this final question. Your work at the Polish Network I think is largely geared toward answering this question. So if you guys have some quick pointers, quick tips or places, even that people could go for more information. How can women work toward this place of flourishing, as they're trying to balance all these roles they're in? Joy, you're the executive director, take it and run. 

Joy Dahl: 

I think the place to start is again, in authentic community. That's something that we believe is the backbone of Polish Network. And wherever you have that community, we welcome you to come to any of our gatherings. We have a national gathering, we have lunch and learns, we have local chapters. But find that small group of authentic community, we need sisters to walk the journey, we need to be able to take our mask off. Life transformation happens in authentic community, the encouragement, the digging deep into the hard questions of God and faith, hearing from the Lord as he speaks through others that are discerning the spirit and in Scripture with us. I really think that that is the backbone of again, flourishing life and how to move forward in any roles and any challenges that we may face. It's having that authentic community, our go to women who understand they're like minded, they affirm us, they can challenge us, but they're right there with us walking the journey. 

Kymberli Cook: 

It's almost like they're the soil that you need to be planted in, and so everybody can be growing. Brandy, is there anything you would like to add? 

Brandy Baxter: 

I would just add for our church leaders and our community leaders to support women by partnering with organizations like Polish Network to create a safe space where women can develop authentic community. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Okay, all right. Well, we hit right our time mark. I was afraid that we wouldn't. I have so enjoyed this conversation, and the three of us need to get together and have coffee as sisters anyway, because this has been a fabulous time. Thank you so much Brandy and Joy for joining us. 

Brandy Baxter: 

Thank you for having us. 

Joy Dahl: 

Appreciate it. 

Kymberli Cook: 

Absolutely. And we just want to thank you for listening. Please do subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast app and leave us an honest review. It really does help more people discover these conversations. And we hope that you'll join us next time as we discuss issues of God and culture. 

Speaker 1: 

Thanks for listening to The Table Podcast. Dallas Theological Seminary, teach truth, love well. 

Brandy Baxter
Brandy Baxter is the Strategic Partnerships Director at Polished Network where she builds meaningful relationships with those who share in the Polished mission: Polished gathers women to navigate the workplace and explore faith together in authentic community.   Brandy is a Future-Focused Financial Coach.  She is currently a Doctoral student at Regent University studying Strategic Foresight and she is a veteran of the US Air Force.  She is active in her local community and is a 2020 Governor’s Volunteer Award Recipient for Service to Veterans.  She is married to Dr. Herman Baxter, Dean of Students at Dallas Theological Seminary, and retired Air Force Major. She is mom to daughters, Joy and Faith. She has the gift of exhortation and coaching others to follow God’s lead in their lives. 
Joy Dahl
Dr. Joy Dahl is a disciple-making disciple, helping believers embrace their calling as Christ’s ambassadors in the world and in the workplace. As a CPA and a Chief Financial Officer by trade, Joy has focused most of her career on start-up and high-growth companies in Washington DC, New York, and Texas. Joy earned three degrees from Dallas Theological Seminary: Master of Christian Education, Master of Biblical Studies, and Doctor of Ministry. Her emphasis on the integration of faith and work led to her current role as Executive Director of Polished Network, which gathers women to navigate the workplace and explore faith together in authentic community. Joy blogs monthly on Bible.org, serves on the Board of Entrust which multiplies leaders to multiply churches, and she is the visionary behind the BOLDLY Conference––the first-of-it’s kind Faith + Work for Women Conference launching in 2021. Joy and her husband, Gordon, call Dallas home. Joy’s favorite things include: God’s Word, international travel, dark chocolate, horses, flowers, beach getaways, running, big dogs, and adventure!   
Kymberli Cook
Kymberli Cook is the Assistant Director of the Hendricks Center, overseeing the workflow of the department, online content creation, Center events, and serving as Giftedness Coach and Table Podcast Host. She is also a doctoral student in Theological Studies at Dallas Theological Seminary, pursuing research connected to unique individuality, the image of God, and providence. When she is not reading for work or school, she enjoys coffee, cooking, and spending time outdoors with her husband and daughters.
Contributors
Brandy Baxter
Joy Dahl
Kymberli Cook
Details
November 16, 2021
Flourish, Polished
Share