Celebrating 10 Years of The Table Podcast

In this episode, Bill Hendricks and Drs. Darrell Bock and Mikel Del Rosario discuss with Milyce Pipkin how The Table podcast started ten years ago, the lessons they have learned, and how others can start podcasting.  

About The Table Podcast

The Table is a weekly podcast on topics related to God, Christianity, and cultural engagement brought to you by the Hendricks Center at Dallas Theological Seminary. The show features interviews with guests who are experts on the chosen topic, and each episode is hosted by a member of The Hendricks Center’s team.

Timecodes
02:25
Bock explains how The Table started
07:48
Valuable lessons the hosts learned over the years
13:09
Ways that The Table is a unique podcast experience
16:32
The hosts look back at their favorite shows
22:36
Helpful steps to start a podcast
27:31
Two difficult challenges facing the Church today
31:25
A prayer request to continue to serve Christ, honor God, and care for people
32:59
Yarbrough reflects on the influence of The Hendricks Center and The Table
Transcript

Darrell Bock: 
It's my pleasure to welcome you to a special edition of The Table Podcast, where we are celebrating 10 years of podcasts. That represents almost 500 episodes and 350 hours of recorded material on an array of topics. And so, unlike the normal Table Podcast, which takes place in a studio, interacting with experts, what you are going to be seeing is a chapel that we had, a Cultural Engagement Chapel, in which we celebrated and discussed 10 years of podcasting here at Dallas Theological Seminary. So I'm going to welcome you to The Table, where we discuss issues of God and culture, and today our topic is The Table. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Hi everyone. I'm Milyce Pipkin. I'm an intern and a student here at DTS. And my internship is under the direction of the Hendricks Center. And these three gentlemen are my bosses, right? 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
And so without further ado, just to let you know that these are three of the faces you'll see here at DTS, doing our podcasting on The Table. Our fourth guest, or fourth host, I should say, is not able to be with us, Kymberli Cook. She is attending another matter and was unable to be here with us. These three gentlemen are here and they are hosts of The Table, and you should know them as the faces here at DTS, Dr. Darrell Bock, Bill Hendricks, and Dr. Mikel Del Rosario. And I say that because Dr. Rosario just became such just a few weeks ago, and we're very proud of you and congratulations. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
If you've been thinking about starting your own podcast, we're going to share some experiences here with you that will help you, and that'll be an added value alongside the point of us actually getting an opportunity to celebrate 10 years on air with the podcast, The Table. Happy birthday to you all, off the top. And Dr. Bock, this is your baby. You got all of this started. Tell us a little bit about how that happened. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Well, I need to credit the beginning of the podcast to, not a DTS grad, Steve Jobs. I was in Germany on sabbatical at Tubingen and I regularly turned into the Apple updates when the iPod was announced and I immediately sensed that the iPod had the potential for us to minister to particularly graduates when thinking so much of students at the time who had left the seminary and it would be a means of keeping them up to date with what was going on in the theological world in a simple, straightforward, easy, accessible way along before COVID came along. And so I sent an email, which I still have to this day to John Grasmick, who was Dean at the time, and Mark Bailey saying, "I have an idea about a way we can minister to alumni that would be a direct ministry to them." And I shared it with them. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And when I got back from the sabbatical, Dr. Bailey and I sat down and just in an ad hoc way, used to do podcasts as topics hit the Richter scale. And we thought, "Oh, we need to address this and help keep alums up to date on what's going on." Several years later, we did this for several years, on a very ad hoc basis, no real intentionality behind it, other than to keep ministering in topics that came up as it went along the way. And we were at an event, a very major church event, a global event in Capetown, South Africa, in 2010. It was the Lausanne Worldwide Conference in which we were both attending. I was helping in the background distributing materials to the various sites that were connected. And Mark was attending as the president of the seminary. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And we had an alumni event. And at the alumni event, Mark asked the question, "What can we do to continue to serve you?" And almost in instantly, and in multiple voices, they said, "Please keep those podcasts coming our way." And so on the way out of that meeting, I said to Mark, "We do this ad hoc. There's really no intentionality behind it. Other than when we think an issue's important enough to address, we could be more intentional about what we are doing. And I think it makes sense for us to think about that. And that became the basis for a conversation that extended to my moving or extending my role in ministry here in culture engagement to the Hendricks Center and led directly to the launch of the weekly podcast, which we are celebrating 10 years up. So in fact, we have dual birthdays. We've got the podcasts that were going on for a while, but we are now celebrating 10 weeks of doing something every week to minister to people worldwide. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
And now you have, what, almost 500 episodes? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
We have almost 500 episodes in 10 years. We have 350 hours of material that we have produced in 10 years. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
That is amazing, reaching around the globe, sharing ministry and loving well, all here from DTS. Bill, want to give you an opportunity to tell us how all of this is tied under the Hendricks Center? 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Well, as you know, the motto of the Hendricks Center is shaping compassionate, courageous leaders. We want leaders who are both biblically solid and will stand for the truth of God's word, but also do so in a way that is engaging and is winsome and is Christlike. And so a big part of that is the tone that we use, and what The Table Podcast does is brings both of those together. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
First of all, because it's a DTS product, if you will, DTS has a reputation globally that whatever else comes out of DTS, it's been checked out biblically, right? That's just known out there. And so when we bring professors and other guests onto The Table Podcast, they are people who have gone in depth into the word to understand how the word relates to the issues that we face. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
At the same time in presenting that material, we want to do so with a tone that, as I say, is engaging and Christlike. We certainly have debate at times on The Table Podcast. We don't agree with everything, but the way we have those conversations, that's the key. And what we're trying to do on The Table in a way is to model how we believe Christians should talk to each other and frankly, talk to the culture, so that we are heard. But first of all, we understand, we listen, before we try to speak and we try to understand what's at stake, what's really being said, and then say, "Huh, let's think about what God might have to say about this." 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Right. It's the goal and the mission of The Table Podcast. Thanks for sharing that. And Dr. Del Rosario, we will come to you now. And I just want to ask you, what have you learned since you've been working with the podcast? Because as an intern, I've learned a lot. I was a news anchor and a television person, and I hosted my own television program for 30 years, but just doing this podcast here at DTS, there are a lot of different people who are going to have their hands on it before it ever makes it out to you. So tell us, what have you learned in your process from internship to the position you currently hold? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Yeah, I was Darrell Bock's first intern at the cultural engagement center and wow, just like what you're doing right now, all the way up until now, I'm hosting the show, it takes a team. It really does take a team. There's so many departments that are involved in what we do. Unlike an individual who might just have an idea for a show, record the show in their bedroom, and then post it that day. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
When you're working with a church, an organization, or a school, there are so many moving parts to it. And so we really want to thank the Office of the President, for example, Mark Bailey, Dr. Yarbrough, Josh Winn. They listened to every single episode. And I used to say that Mark Bailey back in the day say he was our biggest fan. He would listen to all the shows and watch all the shows. And even the shows that didn't air, because for one reason or another, we didn't end up airing them. He would hear them all. And so media production, there was a time where the IT department was involved. And so there's so many departments that are involved in it, and really it is a team effort. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
So everything that you see in that 45 minutes, there's probably 100, 200 hours that goes into that from the host preparing to read the book of the guest, preparing to ask questions, to the editing that goes into it, and all that. So there really is a whole lot that goes into The Table. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Right down to the president's office, having the last say on whether or not we're even going to have that person as a guest. I mean, it's a very tedious process, but it's important to do that. We need to do that. Dr. Bock, what have you learned? As if he can learn anything, right?  
 
Darrell Bock: 
I've learned a ton. I have learned, and Bill's already mentioned this, learned the value of listening to people. Sometimes we have a boatload of stuff we want to say, but sometimes we need to think about how we say it. And so the variety of guests, the variety of skills, I've seen the array of gifts that exist in the body of Christ, which causes me to appreciate the way God has gifted each one of us. It's another thing that we have at the center has gifted each one of us with special abilities that give us the slot that he puts us in, that allows us to minister effectively. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
I've learned a lot about teamwork. Mikel has already alluded to the fact that it takes many, many people to put together The Table. You only see the tip of the iceberg in terms of the labor that goes into producing a podcast. I mean, of which the starting point is, "Is this an ID even worthy to give 45 minutes to?" 
 
Darrell Bock: 
I've learned the value of the archive that we've created. That even though we release episodes a week at a time, what we're really about is building the archive and the background so that when you go to the webpage, there's an array of topics. Some of those topics have been looked at from a variety of angles across the archives that we've built on various core themes. So it's been a graduate education to do The Table and to have 350 hours of material that we offer to the public, as a way of thinking and reflecting theologically on what we call evergreen themes. We tend not to talk about particular events. We tend to talk about things and how they matter in principle with what it is the Bible says about the way Christians should think about the world around them. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
So we've tried to inspire and be a catalyst for people to think about the world in which they live in and the application of their Christian faith. So they end up being schizophrenic and living one way at one point, and then dealing with the world and another at another point. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Right. Bill, do you have anything you want to add? 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Well, the only thing I'd add is when we say the Bible speaks to all the issues of life, that's a double-edged sword. On the one side, that's great that it does, and that we need to recognize that. On the other side, it actually creates a bit of a problem for people like us who do the podcast, because there's so many issues out there to address. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Dr. Bock did mention that when he postulated to Dr. Bailey on doing the table in a weekly way, one of the early questions that Dr. Bailey asked him was, "Do you think you're going to run out of material?" Now, just think about this culture. This is the gift that keeps on giving if you're doing cultural engagement, right? And so we began to collect a list of topics that we wanted to, and for a while we were maybe 10 or 12 in the hopper. And now we're, I don't know, hundreds. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
We got topics out until next year. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
And shows booked up, I hope, until the end of the year. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
And more coming all the time. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Yeah. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
So what I said to Dr. Bailey, when he asked me this question is, "Mark, I haven't given that any thought, because I don't think I'm running out of topics." When we open the show, we say welcome to The Table. We address issues of God and culture in the back of my mind, I'm saying that's a nice way of saying, "We'll talk about anything and everything." 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Right. So now let's ask you this. What makes The Table Podcast different from any other? Because there are a lot of podcasts out there. So what makes ours unique? Dr. Rosario? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
There's a couple of ways. I think that comes to my mind right away is one, I don't know any other podcast that has four hosts who aren't co-hosts. We take turns hosting the show every single week. And I don't know another show that does that. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Also, in terms of seminary shows or shows associated with schools, what we try to do is help people see how the Bible relates to all of life. And so we talk about people going from the Bible to life, but sometimes to help people do that, we have to help them go from life back to the Bible. And so the way in which we engage the way in should we handle these topics, show the relevance of theology to all of life. We start with where people are, where they're at, the issues that they face and help them to have better spiritual conversations that way. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Darrell? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Yeah, and Mikel said, add life back to the Bible, I tell people that we need to learn how to switch hit. We're used to being trained of going from life to the Bible, but almost everyone who reads their Bible is going in the reverse direction. They're going from their life back to the Bible to try and get guidance for how they should live their lives. And we need to learn how to switch hit. So we're trying to model something that, generally speaking, you don't teach directly. And I don't know too many podcasts that are structured to do that. And, and to do it in the way in which we're doing it by not focusing on individual events that are happening in a particular moment and five years from now, you won't remember what that's about, but rather thinking about here's generally where we are and the way we should think about this biblically. And then the way we work is we do 45 minutes on a topic. And sometimes we'll sit back and say that little five-minute clip about that particular aspect of that topic, that could use its own 45. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And so, one of the ways we generate, we're like cell division, okay? The podcast creates its own topical area. And the subtopic in there becomes a topic for the next one that we do in that area. Even though we never cover a topic in sequence, we never build a series by going through a series several weeks, we're building the series in the backdrop of the archive that we're doing. So that over time we've got 14, 16, 18 episodes on LBGTQ topics, for example, covered from about every angle you can think of. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Let me say this. What I see you all doing is just amazing to me. Having worked in broadcasting for years, and then to see this well-oil machine just running and knowing all of the work that's going behind here, behind the scenes. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
I want to go ahead and give you an opportunity to ask a question, if you have any. You have the QR code, go ahead and put it in and then we'll try to get it on before we wrap up in about 10 minutes or so. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
And then just coming back here to the panel, I want to ask what would you say you think you wish that you had known in this process either before, during or after, what would you say that is and/or tell us what would be your favorite episode maybe? And I know that's not a question that Dr. Bock knows. That's why I gave you two. So take your pick. Bill? 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Well, asking me, which show I've done is my favorite show is like asking me, which of my children is my favorite child. I mean, every one of these things is unique and different. Each of the guests is unique and different. Each of the topics is unique and different. Having said that, I mean, I guess if I just say, well, what come to mind immediately? We had a show with a fellow named Tom Terence who had been basically a Ku Klux Klan terrorist back in the civil rights era, and basically ended up in solitary confinement, satisfied that he had done the right thing and now is paying the price for, and totally lost, totally without hope in the world and alone in a cell. And I can't think of many parallel circumstances where somebody is cut off. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
How are they going to ever hear about God in the gospel when their only human contact is with guards who don't let him out except for one hour of the day out in a steel cage in the outside and then it's back into a dark cell. But God managed to penetrate that isolation. It's an incredible story, first of all, of God's grace and salvation, and then to bring him all the way back to where now he has a whole outreach to basically people who were like himself, radical terrorists and people who are racists, particularly in the deep south, holding out the hope of the gospel to them. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
I had another great program with a guy named Horst Schulze who really helped to put... What's the hotel chain? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Is the Marriott or something else? 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
No, I want to say Ritz-Carlton, I'm sorry. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Ritz-Carlton, okay. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
One of the problems being a host is you get your programs all mixed up. Yes. he helped really put Ritz-Carlton on the map with this wonderful set of biblical values that he brought into this organization without using Bible verses. It's a great faith and work story of how you can help people begin to practice excellence and what we would call loving your neighbor in the hospitality industry. And I have a friend who calls this type of thing, basically teaching people discipleship before you teach them evangelism is how it works. But those are two shows. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
I love your examples. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Yeah. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Those are really, really good. Mikel? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Yeah, I would echo what Bill said. It's like, "How can you choose one?" If you ask an artist, like, "What's your favorite song that you wrote?" Or it might be different, like, "What's your favorite song to play on stage?" Something like that. Right? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
So there's just a few that come to mind. We do so many different kinds of shows. I love doing the apologetic shows, but three that come to mind real quick is, one, I got to interview one of my former, she was never actually my student, but I was a high school teacher and her debate coach when she was in high school. And she's the CEO of Marinus Analytics. And she helps the FBI and other law enforcement fight human trafficking using artificial intelligence. So that's an amazing show. It's called "Fighting Human Trafficking with Artificial Intelligence." 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Another one that comes to mind is Costi Hinn. Costi Hinn is the nephew of the famous televangelist, Benny Hinn, and that show I was in the studio and he didn't show up because we had a mix-up with the time. And I hadn't finished reading his book. By the way, if you ever want to do a podcast, read your guest's book. That really helped. And I got halfway through it. And so I said, "Well, I'll just sit on the couch in my office and finish this book until we rescheduled for a few hours later. When I go through his book, I found out that he read a Chuck Swindoll book as part of his movement outside, away from the prosperity gospel and leaving Benny Hinn's organization. So we got to bring that out and what better show to bring it out on than The Table Podcast here at Dallas Seminary. So those are just a couple of examples and just get to meet so many people. And every show is different, and there's a certain charm to every show. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Wonderful. Darrell? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
I'm very much with Bill. It's like asking, "Who's your favorite child?" And each show has a dimension to it that you learn to appreciate. But there is one that I think is particularly significant. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
We've done a series of shows on the racial issues, because race isn't an issue that anyone talks about anymore. And I asked Tony Evans at the beginning of this podcast, "Tell me what I, as a Caucasian, don't get about being Black in America." And he went through a list of five minutes without a break of things that he deals with on a regular basis that I never have to cope with. And I just thought, "Man, this is a great way to descriptively present to people the different worlds in which some of us live so that we can gain an understanding and an empathy. This is the compassionate part of what we do for a contentious space that exists around us in which there's very little positive modeling going on." And here we were two friends. We've been friends for life, modeling our relationship over all these years, the shared ministry that we've had as Dallas seminary grads talking about a contentious area and thinking about how Christ speaks into it. You love all your children, but you give some of them a hug. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
There you go. I love that. Well now my favorite podcast, as if I've done any, is the one that I just recently did with you, Dr. Bock, on an African American life. And you can check that out on the DTS website, along with some of the others as well. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
I just want to give an opportunity now for you to share some of your experience in helping someone who may be contemplating starting their own podcast. What would you say about startup and about continuing with consistency as you all have done for 10 years? Mikel? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
You need to start with what is your why? What is your reason? Why are you doing this? Because when it gets hard and you don't know what content to put out next, you need to keep the audience in mind: who is God calling you to help, and how is God calling you to help them? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
So know your niche, know your audience and what are the problems that they're working through? What are the questions that they have? And then think of those people, that'll help you get over, "What do I look like today if you have a video podcast or what does my microphone sound like?" 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Start with what you have. You can always level up later. Don't let the tech hold you back. Sometimes you just need to start before you're ready. And just trust that God has called you to do this and help those people that you have been called to help and keep them in mind. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Can you, Bill and/or Darrell, can you offer anything from your expertise in your having doing this for the last 10 years, what you would say to somebody who's just now starting and what you've learned and how you can maybe help them get started and continue? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Remember that it's a ministry; it's not about you. It's about your guest. It's about what they offer. It's about the reflection that you're trying to generate for your audience and how you're ministering and serving them. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Podcasting, when it's done well and when it's done right, is designed to help people in the world in which they live. That's what our commitment to cultural engagement is about. We're trying to help Christians live well in a challenging and fallen world to do so without doom and gloom, overwhelming them, because I'm deeply convinced that greater is He who is in us than he who's in the world. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And so, and when we learn to operate from that space, we put ourselves in a position to minister and to serve and to care. And that's the commitment that I think should come through any podcast almost no matter what the topic is. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Yeah. And I'd say you don't have to do it all. There's a lot of different angles with podcasting. There's the content, there's the technology, there's the interviewing, there's the marketing. I mean, there's just a lot of angles to it. Very few people can do all of that well, I mean, very few people. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
And so you have to know, well, what is my strength? And then involve and recruit other people who have strengths that you don't necessarily have. We've talked about: this is a team thing. I, myself, I'm a host, I'm entertainment. Just give me somebody and I'll help them talk, okay? But don't put me back here in the technology side. Don't put me in getting this out on the website. Okay? And not to diminish those things. I have to say, I thank God that around me are people who can get this thing where it needs to go, because I wouldn't be able to do that. And so make it in terms of a team effort. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Yeah. I'll say when the pandemic hit, that was a big wake-up call to us about, "Now we're in our homes. I don't have production staff." All I knew how to do was get in front of a camera and talk, but now I have to find a way to record at home and all of this. So we appreciate what people have done even in the past. But we had an extra special appreciation for them when we were alone, in our respective homes, running The Table. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Very good. And Mikel, I just want you to give us an idea of how you all come up with your topics, because we know that Darrell said there wasn't going to be a problem coming up with the topics for cultural engagement and doing the podcasting. But just for someone who's interested in starting a podcast, how do you come about coming up with the topics and the guests? 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Well, we say at The Hendricks Center, everything we do, we do as a team. And so, one of the things that we do as a team is we discuss topics around the table, not The Table Podcast, but around our conference room table. And we just put the topics out there and suggest topics, things that come up in the news, things that come up, maybe in a magazine that we've read a book we've read, or maybe somebody that we've had lunch with, one of our contacts, maybe one of our grads who are pastors associated with Dallas Seminary has an issue that they're working through or something that they're doing and that we want to highlight. So those are a couple ways that we do that. And then Milyce and I, and other interns will put all the topics out and say, "Well, this one would be good around Easter time. This one would be good around Jewish history month." And we just slot them in places that make the most sense. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
It's been a fun ride. Appreciate you all for accepting me and my internship to work with you because it's been different. Couple of questions now coming from the audience. Based on the conversations you have hosted over the last few years, what do you think is the most difficult challenge to the Church today? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Two of them, and don't ask me which one is more challenging because I don't know. Sexuality and race. Both of them are difficult. Developing a sense of empathy for people whose life story is very different than your own and so many cases, at least in regard to sexuality. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And some of those discussions whose values are very different than your own is a challenge and to do so with the kind of effort to connect with people is important. Because one thing we try and never lose sight of on The Table is there's a mission that we've been given by our Lord, which is to go into the world and make disciples. It doesn't say go into the church and make disciples, which means that we are called to go out into the world and meet people who need what the gospel has to offer just as we needed what the gospel has to offer. And we're supposed to never forget that and make an offer to them that says, "God is going to challenge you in the way that you've been living on the one hand. But I guarantee you, the life that He's going to give you is going to be a much better deal." 
 
Darrell Bock: 
And to do that in some of these areas where so much of a person's identity is at stake is a real challenge. So those would be the two that I would say. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Bill? 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Yeah. And I can see why Jesus prayed in John 17, because I personally think that before we do any kind of a job trying to speak to people outside the Church, we've got to be able to speak to other brothers and sisters within the church. And right now I see that as frankly, our biggest challenge. Jesus prayed for unity. And then we go to Philippians 2, and it talks about seeing the interests of others as more important than your own. And then we get to Colossians 3, and it says be kind to one another, forgive one another. We have all of these passages. We have First John, where John says, "Look, if you say, you're going to love God, that's great, but you can't see Him, but you can see this other brother that God has, or sister, that God has made in His image, and therefore you can see them. But how can you say you love God if you don't love that person.?" 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
And it's challenging enough to speak to people with a whole different worldview. What's really challenging, I'm finding today, is when somebody is telling me they're a brother or sister in Christ and we're having a hard time to even communicate between ourselves. And I think we've got to get it together within the body before we have credibility to go out and try to tell other people how this whole thing called life works. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
Yeah. And part of that is cultural engagement. Part of that loving people well is working to understand people and the issues that they face so that we can have better spiritual conversations and ultimately people can be invited into this life-giving relationship with God, which is actually the only thing that brings lasting human fulfillment. And so this whole idea of cultural engagement that we model on the show is important. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
And as an apologist, I think we are often trained to demonstrate the reasonability or the rationality and the reasonableness of the Christian faith. But many people are looking for the relevance first and the goodness of Christianity first in these areas like race, sexuality. Is Christianity even good before I even care to investigate is Christianity true? And so that's another challenge that the Church faces right now is demonstrating the goodness of Christianity before making a case for its rationality or reasonableness. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Closing comment, Darrell? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Oh, I think it's a prayer request. My prayer would be that as we have sought to serve the Church and to honor God and to care for people that in the next 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 years, that whatever The Table is and becomes, that that would continue to be at the center of what we do. So just pray for us. 
 
Darrell Bock: 
We give a lot of energy, time, reflection on not only what we talk about, but how we talk about it. And that kind of wisdom is desperately needed in a world, which is so contentious that sometimes what is said is not even heard. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Very good. All right. That's all the time we have. We had a lot of great questions coming from the audience. We are going to have little time after the chapel in which you, if you didn't get your question answered, you can actually come up and talk with some of the host here on our panel. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
Thank you all for joining us this morning with this cultural engagement chapel and just sharing your hearts and your experience with us and, yes, we do have a video from Dr. Yarbrough, but I wanted to say to you from me to you all, happy birthday. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Oh, thank you so much. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
May the Lord continue to bless you. 
 
Bill Hendricks: 
Thank you. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
All right. Marian? Okay. We are going to just go straight to a video presentation from Dr. Yarbrough. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
[crosstalk 00:32:59] allow me to join you on the campus today, but I want to honor the Hendricks Center as they celebrate the 10th anniversary of The Table Podcast. The Hendricks Center, named after Dr. Howard Hendricks, has been an influential part of Dallas Theological Seminary since 1986. Dr. Hendricks, also known as Prof, had a passion for teaching the characteristics of a leader with an emphasis on embodying Christ and being a servant leader. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
With the help of Dr. Bill Lawrence and Dr. Andy Seidel, the three men established The Hendricks Center to shape the leaders of tomorrow. In 2012, Dr. Darrell Bock joined the Hendricks Center with the burden for the struggles of current leaders. And he believed spiritual leaders can only lead if they understand the culture around them. After brainstorming with Dr. Mark Bailey, Dr. Bock planned to begin a cultural engagement podcast. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
Some folks feared the podcast would run out of topics, but Dr. Bock assured the team, that was the least of their concerns because according to him, his own words, he said, "Everything is a big category." Well, on October 3rd, 2012, Dr. Bock recorded the first podcast, which we now know as The Table Podcast. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
The first cast had humble beginnings as it was recorded in the old Chafer Chapel radio room. And then in 2014, The Table Podcast was placed in the Todd Academic Building. With the help of Mr. Ryan Holmes, Executive Director of the Media Production Department here at DTS, and his accomplished team, The Table Podcast hosts have used this studio to release episodes on a weekly basis. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
Now, 10 years later, The Hendricks Center has recorded 500 podcasts using four different hosts who are also staff members at The Hendricks Center, Dr. Darrell Bock, Mrs. Kymberli Cook, Dr. Mikel Del Rosario, and Mr. Bill Hendricks, and the impact of these podcasts have been phenomenal. Each one draws helpful theological truths on relevant and engaging cultural topics, topics such as human sexuality, work and faith, biblical themes, and global perspectives. And these podcasts are important for DTS to support because it provides a helpful guide for our students, staff, faculty, and friends in order to teach truth and love well. 
 
Mark Yarbrough: 
Congratulations to Dr. Darrell Bock and the entire staff at The Hendricks Center for 10 years of dedicated service. The DTS body is stronger because of The Table Podcast. 
 
Mikel Del Rosario: 
And on behalf of the seminary and The Hendricks Center, we have a special award to give to Dr. Darrell Bock for 10 years of hosting The Table Podcast. Congratulations, Dr. Bock. 
 
Milyce Pipkin: 
And there you have it. Congratulations, Dr. Bock. Do you have a closing comment or two? 
 
Darrell Bock: 
Yeah. The team that I work with is amazing. The people that I get to meet as a result is amazing. The ministry of God's faithfulness is amazing, and that's what we try and testify to. 

Bill Hendricks
Bill Hendricks is Executive Director for Christian Leadership at the Center and President of The Giftedness Center, where he serves individuals making key life and career decisions. A graduate of Harvard, Boston University, and DTS, Bill has authored or co-authored twenty-two books, including “The Person Called YOU: Why You’re Here, Why You Matter & What You Should Do With Your Life.” He sits on the Steering Committee for The Theology of Work Project.
Darrell L. Bock
Dr. Bock has earned recognition as a Humboldt Scholar (Tübingen University in Germany), is the author of over 40 books, including well-regarded commentaries on Luke and Acts and studies of the historical Jesus, and work in cultural engagement as host of the seminary's Table Podcasts. He was president of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) for 2000–2001, writes for the Christianity Today's Places and Space series, and serves on the boards of Wheaton College, Chosen People Ministries, the Institute for Global Engagement, and Christians in Public Service (CIPS). His articles appear in leading publications. He is often an expert for the media on NT issues. Dr. Bock has been a New York Times best-selling author in nonfiction and is elder emeritus at Trinity Fellowship Church in Dallas. When traveling overseas, he will tune into the current game involving his favorite teams from Houston—live—even in the wee hours of the morning. Married for over 40 years to Sally, he is a proud father of two daughters and a son and is also a grandfather.
Mikel Del Rosario
Mikel Del Rosario (ThM, 2016; PhD, 2022) is Associate Professor of Bible and Theology at Moody Bible Institute. While at DTS, he served as project manager for cultural engagement at the Hendricks Center, producing and hosting The Table podcast. You can find him online at ApologeticsGuy.com, the Apologetics Guy YouTube channel, and The Apologetics Guy Show podcast.
Milyce Pipkin
Milyce Kenny Pipkin (A.K.A., Dee Dee Sharp) is a native of Fayetteville, North Carolina. She is a student at DTS, earning a master’s degree in Christian Education/Ministry to Women (2023) and an intern at the Hendricks Center under the Cultural Engagement Department. She holds a master’s degree in Human Resources Management from Faulkner Christian University in Montgomery, Alabama. Pipkin/Sharp is a 30-year veteran news anchor, reporter, and Public Broadcast System talk-show host (The Aware Show with Dee Dee Sharp). Her accomplishments include working in various markets along the east coast including Charlotte, North Carolina, Columbia and Charleston, South Carolina as well as Mobile and Montgomery, Alabama, and Pensacola, Florida. She also worked as a public representative for the former Alabama Governor, (Don Siegelman), House Ways and Means Chairman, (Representative John Knight) and the Mobile County Personnel Board. Pipkin/Sharp has received several broadcasting news awards throughout her career in the secular world but is now fully committed to the rewards of sharing the Gospel.     She is happily married to the love of her life (Roy Pipkin, Retired Army). Together they have five children and ten grandchildren. She enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and seeing God’s glory in her story along the way in the things she does, the people she meets and the places she goes.  
Contributors
Bill Hendricks
Darrell L. Bock
Mikel Del Rosario
Milyce Pipkin
Details
May 3, 2022
podcasting
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